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What makes Leftist media outlets, jumping to the defence of billionaire Bill Gates extraordinary, is the spin these media manipulators are putting on public concerns over the billionaire’s very public reemergence, since COVID-19 burst onto the global scene.

Author, and popular podcast host, Alley Stuckey gave this sharp relief when she asked, “Is it not weird that the same people who think billionaires are evil seem to trust and adore Bill Gates?”

The Seattle Times exemplified this strange alliance when it reposted, verbatim, an article from the New York Times, which discounted public concern about Bill Gates’ agenda, calling it petty pro-Trump, conspiratorial right-wing noise. The article circled the wagons around Gates, claiming that public concerns were largely only coming from ‘Anti-vaccinators, members of the conspiracy group QAnon and right-wing pundits.’

The Times article issued a blanket claim, arguing that ‘right-wing punditry’ was deliberately spreading misinformation about Gates. The smoking gun in their defence was widespread reaction to a TED talk speech Gates gave in 2015 after it recently went viral. According to the tone of the Times article, ignorant right-wing plebs were using this ‘as evidence that one of the world’s richest men planned to use a pandemic to wrest control of the global health system.’ Apparently this was enough evidence for the authors to justify condescendingly dismissing all public concerns as ‘wild’ (read extremist nonsense).

What follows are reckless generalizations packed with snippets of hagiography designed to exonerate Gates and play down public concerns. In sum, ‘right-wing punditry’ is accused of spreading ‘widespread misinformation.’ All dissenting voices are boxed into a disdained political category; their concerns written-off as an unjust attack on a caring philanthropist who has everyone’s best interests at heart.

To their credit, the NYT article gives reference to the Bill Gates Foundation’s funding of a ‘coronavirus-related patent’. However, the author’s note that this was ‘connected to a potential vaccine for a different coronavirus’ – one that ‘affects poultry’ not humans.

True to Leftist form, when it comes to understanding the concerns of Conservatives and their allies, there’s little care for defining or distinguishing between the claims of “extremists”, and thinkers who raise reasonable questions.

This includes anyone who questions Gate’s track record and his convenient reemergence as a “global leader.” Such as Robert F. Kennedy Jnr. who questioned Gates’ ties to the World Health Organization, mass vaccinations, and pharmaceutical companies.

On April 9, Kennedy responded to Gates’ statements on mandatory vaccination, writing in a lengthy Instagram post:

Vaccines, for Bill Gates, are a strategic philanthropy that feed his many vaccine-related businesses (including Microsoft’s ambition to control a global vac ID enterprise) and give him dictatorial control over global health policy—the spear tip of corporate neo-imperialism. Gates’ obsession with vaccines seems fueled by a messianic conviction that he is ordained to save the world with technology.

Kennedy claimed:

“…Indian doctors blame the Gates campaign for a devastating vaccine-strain polio epidemic that paralyzed 496,000 children between 2000 and 2017…In 2017, the World Health Organization reluctantly admitted that the global polio explosion is predominantly a vaccine strain, meaning it is coming from Gates’ Vaccine Program. Indian government investigations charged that Gates funded researchers committed pervasive ethical violations: pressuring vulnerable village girls into the trial, bullying parents, forging consent forms, and refusing medical care to the injured girls. The case is now in the country’s Supreme Court.”

Kennedy’s examples can be corroborated. The first is supported by Sciencemag.org who in 2019 reported that ‘196 children were paralyzed not by the wild virus, but by a strain derived from a live vaccine.’ The eradication of polio was a targeted goal of Gates, who back in 2017 said, “Progress in fighting polio might be one of the world’s best-kept secrets in global health was we’re looking at now is sort of the endgame of polio eradication.”

The second is supported by Narayana Kumar from The Indian Times. In 2014 girls from tribal regions in India had experienced adverse affects after receiving the HPV vaccine from a study funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF). Two different types of vaccine were used in two different areas, both had similar after affects. The vaccine was linked to hospitalization, and/or death.

Kumar reported that ‘consent was violated because it came from hostel wardens of schools where the mostly poorer tribal children were staying;’ the ‘girls also had no idea about the nature of the disease or the vaccine.’ Ethical questions were then raised about how the vaccines were administered. As were concerns about an apparent conflict of interest due to questionable financial ties between the study, BMGF and pharmaceutical companies.

Kennedy appears to be an apocalyptic climate change theory devotee, is no fan of President Donald Trump, and as such doesn’t fit well into their one-size-fits-all ‘right-wing punditry’ box.

The reasons for subsuming a Kennedy into the right-wing tin foil hat stigma isn’t all that clear. One reason could be the fact that through his organization ‘Children’s Health Defense’, Kennedy has called for globalist and pharmaceutical accountability. He’s also an outspoken critic of mass vaccinations that have left victims in its wake and is an advocate for scientific integrity.

People are suspicious of vaccines. Especially when faced with the prospect of mandatory inoculations. More so when that vaccine hovers over a virus that we’re told by authorities we still know little about. Being cautious about vaccines displays as much prudence, as being inoculated with vaccines that have been well tested, and have a proven safety track record.

People are also suspicious of big pharmaceutical companies and their backers. This doesn’t mean they stop going to pharmacies. Questioning what we’re being sold does not make us part of some fictitious straw-man, ‘right-wing punditry.’ It distinguishes the free, discerning citizen from a feudal subject because the former understands the dangers of following the Fuehrers of this world into accepting their mark of approval, in exchange for the right to a life and a livelihood.

Public concern shouldn’t be so easily dismissed or demonized. This is why the New Times is wrong. It’s extraordinary, that the NYT, whose sole function since 2016, has been to get people to apply “buyer beware” to President Donald Trump, is so quick to criticize those who practice the same with Bill Gates.

References for further reading:[i] Kennedy, Jnr. R.F.  Gates’ Globalist Vaccine Agenda: A Win-Win for Pharma and Mandatory Vaccination Sourced, 18th April 2020 from Global Research: Centre for Research on Globalisation.


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