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Europeans Are Turning against Leftist Parties and Policies

“The truth is, people have really become tired of the radical left’s hold on power. When folks like Klaus Schwab seem to have more say over national sovereignty than the people themselves, then enough is enough.”


A big swing to the conservatives in Europe is a game changer:

Recent national elections and European Union elections have sent shockwaves down the spine of Europe’s leftist leaders and parties. Conservative parties in a number of European countries have dominated the leftist parties. From Ireland to France to Belgium to Germany, the conservatives are clearly in the ascendency.

What is the reason for all this? The elections that were just held over the weekend clearly and unambiguously show that a good majority of Europeans are deeply concerned about the big two ‘Is’: immigration and Islamisation. And these two go together like two sides of a coin.

Open border policies in which almost no questions have been asked over the decades have meant that countless Muslims have moved into Europe. If they all came because they affirm the values and beliefs of the West, that would be one thing. But so many do not.

They are quite happy to see hardcore Islamist values and practices become the norm all throughout Europe. And that is a recipe for disaster, and that is just what the majority of Europeans are now so very worried about and actively resisting.

Whether it is the rising crime rates, the continuous threats and realities of jihadist terrorism (and just think of the upcoming summer Olympics in Paris), or the failure of many immigrants to even bother to learn the language of their newfound home cultures, Europeans are becoming increasingly fed up.

Just look at some of the amazing results. The President of France Emmanuel Macron has called a snap election. Le Pen and the conservatives got double the vote of Macron and his party (32% to 15%), which is why Macron saw the handwriting on the wall and wants to bail out – thus his call for an election within weeks.

National elections have coincided with the EU election results. The Prime Minister of Belgium has resigned after losing to the right in the general election. The conservative Prime Minister of Italy Giorgia Meloni has done quite well both at home and in the EU election, thus consolidating her position.

In Germany, Chancellor Olaf Scholz’s Social Democrats were resoundingly defeated, and the Greens there fared the worst of all. In Ireland and so many other countries the conservatives have made big gains, while the left has been given a real belting. The message is the same everywhere: Europeans want to affirm Europe, and not see it disappear because of runaway immigration, Islamisation and radical leftist agendas.

Indeed, other major concerns were highlighted in these election results. The ugly globalism agenda of groups like the World Economic Forum and the scary nature of radical greens’ politics were also targeted this past weekend. As will be discussed shortly, Europeans have had enough of these far-left groups as well.

The European Parliamentary elections

These elections are held every five years, and in the most recent round, 720 Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) were voted for. Population size of the 27 member nations determines how many MEPS will sit in the EU Parliament. Thus Germany has 96 seats, France 81, Italy 76, Spain 61, Poland 53, on down to Estonia, 7, Cyprus 6, Luxembourg 6, and Malta 6.

These MEPS are not organised by nationality but by political groups, of which there are seven:

  • Group of the European People’s Party (Christian Democrats) – EPP
  • Group of the Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats – S&D 
  • Renew Europe – RE
  • Group of the Greens/European Free Alliance – Greens/EFA
  • European Conservatives and Reformists – ECR
  • Identity and Democracy Group – ID
  • The Left group – The Left

As the various names indicate, groups can be more to the right, centrist, or to the left. Members can belong to only one group, but some are non-aligned to any group (called non-attached Members). Counting still continues for the 720 seats, with around half of the 27 nations’ vote fully counted.

Conservative groups are doing the best so far. The ID group has added 9 seats (up to 58 seats so far); the centre-right EPP has gained 10 seats (up to 186 seats); and the ECR added 4 seats (up to 73 seats). And groups on the left have been losing seats. The RE, which warns against “far-right” groups, has lost 23 seats (down to 79); the S&D lost 4 seats (down to 135); the Left lost 1 seat (down to 36 seats); and the Greens lost 18 seats (down to 53 seats).

Commentary

We will learn more about the final numbers in the days ahead. But so far it looks like there is a clear swing to the right. Let me draw upon a few commentaries on this result. Yesterday Freddy Gray posted a piece on the election with this as his opening sentence: “Can the ‘far right’ still really be called the ‘far right’ if it becomes the mainstream? That’s a question for political scientists to ponder as tonight’s European elections results come tumbling in.”

He continues:

The European Parliament elections are often dismissed as little more than an opinion poll – since the Parliament’s powers are limited and it is the EU Commission which makes the decisions that most affect people’s lives. But the general political direction of the continent is clear: parties that stand strongly against immigration, that embrace anti-globalist rhetoric and reject green ideology are doing well. The Greens are in retreat.

The once-unacceptable right is now in power in Italy, Hungary and Slovakia. It is part of governing coalitions in Sweden (where it is in retreat) and Finland and will be in the Netherlands shortly. It’s leading polls in Belgium and Austria too. After tonight’s European results, which gave Flemish nationalists a victory, the Belgian prime minister Alexander De Croo announced his resignation.

Britain doesn’t vote in the European elections, obviously, because we voted to leave. But our own general election on 4 July looks almost certain to make us an outlier – if Labour comes to power, Britain will move left as the continent goes in the other direction.

His closing paragraph says this: “‘Right is good,’ said Hungarian prime minister Viktor Orbán, as he voted this week. ‘To go right is always good. Go right!’ In November, America might do exactly that. The year 2016 will always be remembered for Trump and Brexit. But 2024 could go down as the year when the new right consolidated its power.”

Two more comments, looking especially at the situation in France. Dutch freedom fighter and resistance leader Eva Vlaardingerbroek said this: “Seeing Macron be so utterly crushed that he’s forced to dissolve the parliament and has to call for snap elections is by far the best news of the day. Amazing to see that tyrant finally be put in his place. Beautiful. Just beautiful.”

And Frieda Powers said this:

President Emmanuel Macron is risking it all in hopes that the people of France “make the right choice” following his stunning call for a snap election. While the French leader says he is “confident” citizens concur with the push to stop the surge of the far-right in his nation and across Europe, Macron’s call to dissolve the national parliament came as a shock to many.

European Parliament elections were held from Thursday to Sunday and in France, it was a landslide victory for the right, with Marine Le Pen’s National Rally receiving double the votes of Macron’s globalist centrists. In an attempt to regain authority, Macron is taking a gamble on calling for fresh elections at the end of the month….

“The French have expressed themselves and this historic election shows when people vote, the people win…,” Le Pen said at an election night party in Paris.

“I can only welcome this, we are ready for it… we are ready to exercise power if the French put their trust in us in these new national elections,” she said concerning Macron’s announcement. “We are ready to restore the country to defend the interests of the French people. We are ready to put an end to mass immigration. Ready to [build the strength of the economy] as a priority. And ready to begin the reindustrialization of the country. To be clear, we are ready to straighten out the country, and we are ready to relive France.”

“Marine Le Pen’s National Rally (RN, Rassemblement National) party looks set to become the largest single party in the European Union after a spectacular result in Sunday’s elections for the European Parliament,” Le Monde reported.

The truth is, people have really become tired of the radical left’s hold on power. When folks like Klaus Schwab seem to have more say over national sovereignty than the people themselves, then enough is enough. As I keep saying, at the end of the day politics will not save us. But politics can be used, along with people power, to help rectify bad politics and help restore better politics.

I for one eagerly await the results of all this in the weeks and months ahead.

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