Australia News & Commentary

Federal MP Says: “Immoral” to Start Injecting Children With Experimental COVID-19 Vaccines

Should we inject Australian children with the COVID vaccine?
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Federal MP Craig Kelly has said it would be “immoral” at this stage to begin injecting Australian children with experimental COVID-19 vaccines, describing it as a form of “child abuse.”

Kelly made the comments on Facebook today after 9News published a story suggesting the Liberal MP refuses to “immunise” his son.

In his post, Kelly outlined his seven considerations in weighing up the harm and risk factor when it comes to injecting new, experimental COVID-19 vaccines into his child.

Kelly notes:

1. There has not been a single fatality for anyone under 30 from COVID in Australia.

2. Stockholm University has published a study estimating the chances of survival for someone under 20 (with no underlying conditions) if they contract COVID as being around 99.9996% – and 99.96% for someone with an underlying condition.

3. The medical knowledge of effective ‘early treatment options’ for someone that contracts COVID is advancing significantly, especially for: Ivermectin, HCQ, Zinc, Vitamin C and D.

4. The current community transmission and infection rate in Australia is effectively zero.

5. Dr. Peter Doshi, the associate editor of the British Medical Journal has written of the trial results of the vaccine:

“…these results refer to the trials’ primary endpoint of COVID-19 of essentially any severity, and importantly not the vaccine’s ability to save lives, nor the ability to prevent infection, nor the efficacy in important subgroups (e.g. frail elderly). Those still remain unknown.

“…these results reflect a time point relatively soon after vaccination, and we know nothing about vaccine performance at 3, 6, or 12 months, so cannot compare these efficacy numbers against other vaccines like influenza vaccines (which are judged over a season).”

…children, adolescents, and immunocompromised individuals were largely excluded from the trials, so we still lack any data on these important populations.”

6. In Moderna’s phase 3 vaccine trials, about 10 percent of participants experienced fatigue, roughly 9 percent reported muscle aches and about 5 percent had joint pain and headaches. Pfizer’s phase 3 interim analysis documented fatigue in 3.8 percent of participants and headaches in 2 percent. Injection site pain was noted in both trials. But no one has any idea if there are any long-term side effects.

7. Despite the approvals in the UK, Regulators around the world are waiting on more data: “We lack data on the effectiveness of the clinical trials and on the important subgroups that participated in these large studies,” said Claus Bolte, head of the authorisation division at Swissmedic, at a press briefing on Tuesday organised by the Federal Office of Public Health.

For example, Swissmedic wants to know about the pre-existing illnesses of people who took part in these studies. According to the regulator, acceptance of such rapidly developed vaccines requires a high degree of trust in manufacturers and approving authorities. It is therefore important to examine very closely the effects on different groups of people.

Kelly went on to say, based on currently available information, and conversations he’s had with Professors around the world with expertise in this particular field, it would be “immoral” at this stage to start injecting Australian children with the first-ever mRNA COVID-19 vaccines.

“On the evidence I have seen, I don’t think there’s any necessity,” Kelly said. “I think it would be a form of child abuse.”

The Liberal MP said he hopes the mRNA vaccines are successful, “but for Australian children, we need to learn from history, and proceed slowly, with the highest level of caution and skepticism.”


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