News & Commentary World

The Super-Rich Want to Take Your Super to Fight “Climate Change”

While they risk your portfolio, with the blessing of the Government, and Unions, there’s minimal risk to their own. All this suggests that “Climate Change” is a game for the rich.
  • 440
    Shares

Prince Charles’ recent calls for Australian superannuation organisations to pay for initiatives based on the anthropogenic ‘apocalyptic climate change’ delusion, prove that the rich play hard with our hard-earned money, and consider themselves entitled to it.

In a pre-recorded speech for the Australian Institute of Superannuation Trustees conference in Adelaide, Prince Charles talked up the urgency of investing in a ‘zero net carbon’ future.

Charles applauded “several Australian superannuation funds” who’ve already aimed at a future without CO2 emissions, saying:

 “[Super Funds] will be doing so in the best financial interests of their members, given the risks that global warming and climate change present to each fund’s long-term investment performance.”

The speech was a “Climate Change” sales pitch, with the Prince uptalking the features and benefits of his ‘Terra Carta’ project.

A project described by 7News as “a charter aiming to put nature, people, and the planet at the heart of the financial sector.”

One of the goals of the ‘Terra Carta’ project, according to The Australian, was to merge material wealth with sustainability, with Charles stating that we want to show how “investing in sustainability and building prosperity are not mutually exclusive.”

A key filament to the ‘Terra Carta’ is establishing its ‘Natural Capital Investment Alliance’, an alliance filled with well-funded members/investors committed to “ensuring that investment and financial flows are consistent with a low carbon nature-positive future.”

A 2020 list compiled by the Sydney Morning Herald suggests the super funds Charles was referring to are REST, AMP, Macquarie, Colonial First State, AustralianSuper, Aware Super, Cbus, HESTA and UniSuper.

Each one, said the SMH, have either directly or indirectly voiced the goal of achieving net-zero emissions. Some have committed to “invest only in net zero emissions companies and rolled out beefed-up climate plans.”

Charles, ever the apocalyptic environmentalist, enticed conference delegates with trope dire predictions, and flowery prospects of endless gold at the end of the zero-carbon rainbow,

“There are trillions of dollars in sovereign wealth funds, pension funds, insurance and asset portfolios looking for investible projects that are genuinely sustainable, with good long-term value and strong rates of return.”

Charles’ “Climate Change” sales pitch sits right up there with former Prime Ministers, and avid “Climate Change” cult enthusiasts, Kevin Rudd, and Paul Keating, demanding the LNP government do more to “fight” climate change and increase in the % forced by the Government out of Australian worker’s hands into Super Funds, from 9.5% to 12%.

Australian Super Funds, in line with ASFA’s statistics, hold a total of $3.0 trillion in worker and retiree funds.

It’s too coincidental to dismiss a possible link between fearmongering about climate change, demands for a forced increase in super contributions, and the legal gamble being proposed that messes with $3 trillion in Australian’s Super Fund portfolios.

So, there are $3 trillion reasons for questioning the super-rich using Super Funds as ATMs, from which they can play esoteric, “Climate Change” saviour – spouting from their private jets, yachts, and carbon footprint mansions, “it’s all for our own good.”

While they risk your portfolio, with the blessing of the Government, and Unions, there’s minimal risk to their own.

All this suggests that “Climate Change” is a game for the rich.

It allows self-righteous, catastrophising Climate Change crusaders to prance around, gambling money on a theory, based on dubious computer modelling, that fails to address natural climate change, and solar activity, while its adherents lose sight of the dynamic role of the five climates because of an obsession with the Polar climate.

Creation care infers that good environmental policy should be a consideration for investments, but caveat emptor trumps the “Climate Change” self-righteous cause.

As Geologist Ian Plimer has painstakingly asserted, “CO2 is plant food, not pollution.”

Being told to divest financial interests away from responsible investments which provide reliable returns towards a CO2 free world, is selling a treeless existence.

Likewise, those selling carbon as an oppressor are telling us to hate our existence.

Carbon is the base element of organic life. A carbon emissions-free future is telling people to invest in nothing, or it’s a smokescreen for the malevolent depopulation through extermination.

The latter isn’t unrealistic when the view of radical environmentalists is that humans are a virus infecting the planet.

Footnote that this is without me unpacking critical considerations concerning wealthy people painting capitalism, carbon, and CO2 as a great Satan in need being destroyed.

What’s wrong with Charles’ sales pitch isn’t so much the contempt it exposes, but the questions it raises.

Does the super-rich see superannuation as easy money? A slush fund they can access through organisations, who can be easily manipulated into happily throwing your money into their pet “social justice” projects?

Take for instance, how some wealthy Unions skim off the top, using super funds to finance projects that are political by nature.

Funds are used to fight for the political survival of the Union, help elect Labor Party candidates, or advance an ideological agenda, at a cost to the worker. Sometimes without their knowledge. Often without their informed consent.

While these organisations play with those funds, ordinary Australians aren’t allowed access to their own money unless they’re aged 65 or meet a needs-based criterion.

Even access for the eligible retiree comes with conditions of use.

Prince Charles, Kevin Rudd, and Paul Keating, who live off investments, taxpayer-funded allowances (pensions), and expense accounts, for parliamentary and civil service, serve to benefit from an increase in superannuation funds from taxpayers.

An increase allows Climate Change activists a deeper well to draw funding, under the guise of investing in, as Prince Charles called it, “a road map to a sustainable future.”

By joining him in his “Climate Change” initiative, Super Funds will be taking on “an opportunity to advance their leadership on climate.”

Queen Elizabeth’s heir, and supporter of World Economic Forum’s “The Great Reset,” also told Australian Super Funds, they would be ‘pioneering leaders in social justice for older Australians.’

His price point is saving the planet from destruction. His method of sale reflects the approach of grifters and thieves, scaring people for profit.

Caveat emptor.

Long live the Queen!


  • 440
    Shares