What comes after same-sex marriage?

  • 2.5K
    Shares

What comes after same-sex marriage? You only have to look to the countries that have already redefined the institution to get an idea. Here are twelve examples.

Example #1:

John Bercow, Speaker of the House of Commons, has argued that the fight for “equality” is not over until churches abandon their faith.

 

“We don’t want to behave like it’s all over [now that SSM is legal]… I still feel we’ll only have proper equal marriage when you can bloody well get married in a church if you want to do so, without having to fight for the equality that should be your right.”

A frightening threat to the freedom of everyone.

[quads id=1]

Example #2:

Derby City Council has blocked a Christian couple’s application to foster children because the couple were not willing to promote homosexuality to young children. Their Christian faith was considered “inimical” to the interest of children. According to the Equalities and Human Rights Commission, young ones in their care were at risk of being “infected” by Christian morals. When the case was referred to the High Court, judges Lord Justice Munby and Justice Beatson, suggested that Christians were not suitable foster carers and that “the equality provisions concerning sexual orientation should take precedence.”

Andrea Minichiello Williams, director of Christian Legal Centre, said, “If Christian morals are harmful to children and unacceptable to the state, then how many years do we have before natural children start being taken away from Christians?”

Example #3:

Vishnitz Girls School in north London, is a private, Jewish, all-girls school, for children aged three to eight. The school, which has more than 100 pupils, faces closure after failing a third inspection by the Office of Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills.

According to the inspectors, the school has denied their students, “a full understanding of fundamental British values” and “restricts [their] spiritual, moral, social and cultural development…” How has the school done this? By choosing not to teach their students about homosexuality and gender reassignment.

And yes, I said ages three to eight.

Example #4:

Telescope Media Group is a Christian film company based in Minnesota. It’s a small family business, run by husband and wife team, Carl and Angel Larsen. Their company tagline reads, “We want to magnify Christ like a telescope.”

Recently, a Minnesota court has ruled that the couple are in violation of the state’s Human Rights Act which requires them to abandon their faith by using their God-given gifts to create films celebrating homosexuality and same-sex marriage.

According to the Alliance Defending Freedom, “State officials have categorically, publicly, and repeatedly threatened to prosecute expressive business owners who decline to create speech promoting same-sex marriage. Steep penalties exist for violating the law, including payment of a civil penalty to the state; triple compensatory damages; punitive damages of up to $25,000; a criminal penalty of up to $1,000; and even up to 90 days in jail.”

Jeremy Tedesco, ADF Senior Counsel, warned, “The same government that can force them to violate their faith and conscience can force anyone of us to do the same.”

Example #5:

Two years after marriage was redefined in Massachusetts, David Parker’s son brought home a book from his kindergarten classroom. The book was designed to celebrated and normalised homosexuality and same-sex marriages. The following year, Rob and Robin Wirthlin had a similar experience when their seven year old son, and his class, were read a book about the marriage of two homosexual characters.

The parents requested prior notification and the opportunity to opt out when the subject of sexuality was being discussed. Their request was rejected. The school later had Parker arrested after he refused to leave a meeting with the principal and curriculum director.

In 2006 Parker and other concerned parents filed a civil rights lawsuit against the school, which a Federal District Judge dismissed. According to the judge, teaching six and seven year old children about homosexuality helps to make them better citizens of a diverse society.

The judge gave them three options: remove their children from public schools, home school, or try to elect a new school board.

Example #6:

When Steve Tennes, owner of Country Mill Farms, expressed his personal view of marriage on his Facebook page, East Lansing city officials responded by banning him from selling at the 2017 city farmers markets. The Facebook post came about when an unknown individual inquired about a past incident where Tennes referred a same-sex couple to an orchard willing to host homosexual celebrations.

For a time, Country Mill Farm stop hosting weddings altogether, but the officials still weren’t satisfied. The city’s attorney said, “This is not about speech and it’s not about religion. It’s about discrimination.”

But to Tennes, it’s about much more: “Government officials should never be allowed to ban citizens from participating in any aspect of public life simply because that person said something the city doesn’t like. The city of East Lansing is asking us to choose between the peaceful expression of our beliefs and our livelihood. No one should face that choice.”

Example #7:

Two years after marriage was redefined in Denmark, the Danish parliament voted 85-24 in favour of forcing state churches to conduct homosexual weddings. The law mandates that all priests belonging to the Danish church must participate in homosexual marriages, either by officiating the wedding or by seeking out a priest who will.

However, as LNP Queensland MP George Christensen pointed out, “Unlike church in Australia, the Church of Denmark is an established church, or a state-backed institution, so the Danish government may exercise its wishes… But every church in Australia is issued with state-sanctioned licenses for marriage and has state-sanctioned tax benefits so they would soon be pressured to ‘comply or else.’”

Example #8:

When Jesse Thompson, a transgender hockey player, was 17 she filed a complaint to the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario. At the time, Hockey Canada’s dressing room policy required children aged 11 years and older to change in separate rooms, depending on the child’s biological gender. Following the complaint, the dressing room policy in Ontario was changed to allow transgender players to use the dressing room of their choosing. Young boys changing with girls, young girls changing with boys.

This season, all Ontario’s minor hockey coaches, trainers and managers are required to undergo mandatory transgender training developed by an LGBTQ human rights organisation. Any coach, manager or trainer to opt-out will be denied registration by their minor hockey association. Phillip McKee, executive director of Ontario Hockey Federation, said, “It provides information on gender itself, explaining what gender identity is and what makes up gender identity and expression.”

Example #9:

In 2016 LGBT rights groups filed a lawsuit against the Utah State Board of Education and several school districts over a law, nicknamed “No Promo Homo.” According to the lawsuit, these “anti-gay” laws were “enacted in order to express moral disapproval of ‘homosexuality,’” and prevent teachers from advocating homosexuality to children in public school classrooms. Further, the lawsuit suggests the “No Promo Homo” laws target LGBT students by requiring schools to adopt materials “‘emphasizing abstinence before marriage and fidelity after marriage,’ while ‘prohibiting instruction in… the advocacy of sexual activity outside of marriage.’”

Troy Williams, executive director of Equality Utah said, “These laws send a message that [homosexuality is] shameful and must be hidden and censored… The time has come to end the stigma…”

“It is long past time for these dangerous laws to be struck from the books,” Kate Kendell, the executive director of the National Center for Lesbian Rights argued. “The U.S. Supreme Court has held that sexual orientation is ‘a normal expression of human sexuality’ and that LGBT people must be treated equally under the law.”

One of the plaintiffs was a seven year old boy who claimed he was harassed in kindergarten for sometimes choosing to wear girls clothing.

Example #10:

In 2010 Steve Tourloukis, Canadian father of two, requested prior notification when his children, aged four and six, were to be taught about homosexuality, LGBTIQ issues and abortion in the classroom. The school denied Toutloukis’ request suggesting it was mandatory that his children be educated, or reeducated, on these issues. What followed was a seven year battle with the public school board, the Elementary Teacher’s Union, and lesbian, Premier Kathleen Wynne’s Liberal government.

According to Life Site News, “Tourloukis made it clear in his 2012 legal challenge he did not object to his children being taught facts, or to discussions and opinions by classmates on these subjects. But he did object to teachers, who are authority figures, making ‘value judgments’ in class, such as presenting homosexuality as natural, or abortion as morally acceptable.”

Kate Hughes, lawyer for the Elementary Teacher’s Federation of Ontario argued that teachers are actually mandated by law to advocate homosexuality, lesbianism, transgenderism and queerness throughout the curriculum. Further, they are to teach children not just to “tolerate” the LGBTIQ lifestyle, but to “honour, respect” and “celebrate it.”

Jack Fonseca, Campaign Life Coalition’s senior political strategist, called this “a brazen, unashamed admission that indoctrination was the goal.”

Example #11:

Alicia Gunn is a public school teacher from Mississauga, Ontario. She has won awards for her teaching methods and has had her work endorsed by the Ontario government. She also happens to be also a lesbian, ‘married’ to a woman.

At a pro-gay teachers’ conference in 2015, Gunn revealed how she teaches 9 to 10 year old kids to accept homosexuality. “…I can hide it a little bit in the math,” Gunn revealed. “And what I mean is I can say, ‘I’m just teaching your kid about division…’”

As an example, Gunn displayed her math class on triangles. The lesson was based on the pink triangle used in Nazi concentration camps to identify sexual offenders, rapists, paedophiles, zoophiles, and homosexuals.

Gunn explains, “The pink triangle was a badge of shame that the Nazis made gay men wear during the holocaust. So what we did is take a look at all the different badges of shame that people would have been wearing. Now mathematically where we were is looking at different types of triangles… So, that was the math aspect. But more importantly was the [pro-homosexual] thinking that went into it.”

Example #12:

Two years after marriage was redefined in the U.K., Felix Ngole found himself in a discussion on Facebook. The topic was same-sex marriage, and during the discourse, the-father-of-four put forward the Christian position on the matter. At the time, Ngole was a postgraduate student, enrolled in a social work course at Sheffield University.

Two months after posting his comment, Ngole received a letter from the university informing him that he was under investigation. He was eventually summoned to a disciplinary hearing where he was told that he had breached social work guidelines regarding “personal conduct” and “brought the profession into disrepute.”

A ‘Fitness to Practice’ committee concluded that while Ngole was entitled to his opinion, he was in danger of causing offense by voicing it. As a result, Ngole was expelled from the university and barred from gaining professional qualifications.

In the letter expelling Ngole, a departmental official said, “The committee were clear to point out that their decision is not based on your views but on your act of publicly posting those views such that it will have an effect on your ability to carry out a role as a social worker… this action was extremely poor judgement on your part and had transgressed boundaries which are not deemed appropriate for someone entering the social work profession.”

In other words, “I may not agree with what you have to say, so I’ll fight to the death for the right to prevent you saying it.”


  • 2.5K
    Shares

Share your thoughts